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Using Mac OS X Lion Server

Using Mac OS X Lion Server


If you’re considering a Mac OS X server for your small business, school, nonprofit, or home network, this easy-to-follow guide will help you get up and running in no time. You’ll learn how to share files, mail, and calendar information on your desktops, iPads, iPhones, and other devices, whether you’re new to Mac OS X servers or need to update your skills for the Lion edition.
List Price:
Price: 32.99

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Using Mac OS X Lion Server

Using Mac OS X Lion Server


If you’re considering a Mac OS X server for your small business, school, nonprofit, or home network, this easy-to-follow guide will help you get up and running in no time. You’ll learn how to share files, mail, and calendar information on your desktops, iPads, iPhones, and other devices, whether you’re new to Mac OS X servers or need to update your skills for the Lion edition.
List Price:
Price: 29.99

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Hyperscale is where the growth is: Cloud and virtualisation ravage enterprise server demand

Hyperscale is where the growth is: Cloud and virtualisation ravage enterprise server demand
The enterprise and small or midsize business segments remain relatively … as virtualisation and cloud services reduced the need for companies to buy their own server hardware. The EMEA market had the weakest start to the year in terms of shipments …
Read more on ZDNet

Sometimes you just need some physical hardware
It’s amazing how much processing power you can shove into such a small space … we’ll just have to expand out the server farm. It’s also amazing how big the boxes are to hold that little bit of hardware (scroll down for that pic).
Read more on Tech Target

2016 Review of Small Business Accounting Systems
While some small business owners prefer a product that is installed on their desktop or server, others are looking for accessibility – whether that be from laptops, tablets, iPhones, or Android devices. Entrepreneurs and their accountants can both agree …
Read more on CPA Practice Advisor

Server shipments fall as firms use cloud and virtualisation to cut hardware costs
Hyperscale datacentre builds are propping up the worldwide server market, as SMEs and enterprises look to cloud and virtualisation technologies to cut hardware costs … “The enterprise and small or mid-size business segments remain relatively flat …
Read more on Computer Weekly

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Latest Windows Server 2012 Small Business News

Who killed Windows Small Business Server? Google
And plus, with Windows 8 and Surface making the public rounds, there’s plenty of fanfare to go around. But there’s something most obviously missing from the latest Server 2012 lineup, and that is a subsequent Small Business Server release. Redmond …
Read more on Beta News

Windows Server 2012 Essentials: Easy small business Internet and cloud
Figures A and B show the login and landing page experience for small business employees. Also, because Windows Server 2012 Essentials has built-in hooks to Office 365, it is particularly suited to small businesses that want to integrate on-premise Active …
Read more on TechRepublic

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HPE server business on an upswing in a down market | #HPEdiscover

HPE server business on an upswing in a down market | #HPEdiscover
We’ve used a modular approach … and specialize our offering to yield the best outcome for the typical … hybrid IT through subscription model to small and mid-sized businesses. The on-premise server as provides the benefits of the cloud and scales …
Read more on Silicon Angle

Server Market Revenues Decline in 1Q16: Gartner & IDC
The enterprise and small or midsize business (SMB … SYSTEMS Industry Price Index With respect to individual server manufacturers, both the firms have a similar view on the top five vendors. According to Gartner and IDC, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise …
Read more on Yahoo Finance

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Latest Small Business Web Server News

Top 10 web design packages for small business
To help you decide which option is best for your needs here are – in no particular order – techradar pro’s top 10 web design tools for small business. Creating your … ready to publish locally or to any FTP server. Xara Web Designer Premium is an …
Read more on in.techradar.com

Esri Sponsors AFCEA NGA Small Business Breakfast
Esri announced its sponsorship of the upcoming small business breakfast on June 10 hosted … Esri applications, running on more than one million desktops and thousands of Web and enterprise servers, provide the backbone for the world’s mapping and spatial …
Read more on Directions Magazine

Guide to securing your website and online business
It’s not just our personal and social lives that are moving online, more and more businesses are stepping into the World Wide Web to … get your business’ website up, you deserve a round of applause because you’re one of the early small business …
Read more on DIGIT

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TerraMaster NAS 1.6GHz/512MB Network Storage F2-NAS2 Cloud Storage 2 Bays NAS Server RAID Storage All-Aluminum Built Case for Small Business and Home (Diskless)

[wpramazon asin=”B00NXL662Y” keyword=”business cloud server”]

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Nvidia will soon incorporate Plex Media Server into its Shield Android TV set-top box

Nvidia will soon incorporate Plex Media Server into its Shield Android TV set-top box
But the requirement to have both a home server or NAS box on your network plus a media streamer … The solution many Plex users turn to is repurposing an older PC or Mac and leaving a computer running 24/7. This, however, can drive up your utility bill.
Read more on Greenbot

Plex Does Away with Dedicated Server Requirement for NVIDIA Shield Users
Plex’s usage of the NVIDIA Shield as a home media server also goes to show that there is still some … to give consumers cloud-like features without the need to turn on a computer at all.
Read more on Variety

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Cool Buy Small Server images

Check out these buy small server images:

Fruit compote dish – Lincoln White House china service – 2012
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Image by Tim Evanson
A fruit compote bowl from the Lincoln White House china service of 1861.

In the 1800s, presidents were expected to furnish the White House with their own beds, furniture, plates, and artwork. When a president left office, he took his things with him. The White House itself owned only a few furnishings. Furthermore, the White House was considered a public building. As such, it was open to the public at all times. It was not unusual to find members of the public wandering in and out of the White House at all hours of the day (and sometimes night). When a president left office, it was not unusual for members of the public to simply steal artwork, serving dishes, flatware, or other objects. Indeed, many souvenir-hunters would simply cut squares of fabric from the wallpaper, upholstered chairs, or carpets. Members of the White House staff also routinely stole items from the building, keeping them as souvenirs or (more often) selling them to the highest bidder or in antique shops.

When the Lincolns moved into the White House in March 1861 (inaugurations did not move to January until the 1940s), they found it in a terrible state. It was shabby, vandalized, and in extensive disrepair. It lacked many rudimentary modern amenities, such as gas lighting and plumbing.

Mary Todd Lincoln discovered that the White House china – which had been purchased in the administration of Franklin Pierce in the early 1850s – was in a sorry state. There were only enough plates, cups, saucers, and serving dishes to serve about 10 guests, and what china did remain was mismatched and damaged.

Each incoming president traditionally received ,000 to furnish the White House. Congress appropriated this money to Lincoln in April 1861, and gave him another ,000 on top of that. Mary Todd Lincoln and her cousin, Elizabeth Todd Grimsley (who was helping the Lincolns set up house), traveled to New York City in May 1861 to shop for furnishings for the White House. They arrived in the city on May 12. On May 15, they visited two firms: Lord & Taylor, and E.V. Haughwout & Co.

Haughwout’s showed her a "specimen plate" they had exhibited at the Crystal Palace Exhibition in New York in 1853. The company had produced the plate in the hopes that President Pierce would like it and buy a set of china based on its look. The "Pierce Plate" was a creamy white porcelain with picture of an American eagle in the Napoleonic style (slender wings outspread, slender neck and head, facing right, leaning left), gripping a shield emblazoned with the U.S. colors (white band at top rimmed in blue, with blue stars on the field, and narrow red and white stripes below). The shield tilted to the right, and the lower southeast corner lost in rosy clouds, which surrounded and were in back of the eagle. Drifting through the clouds left and right of the shield was a ribbon with the national motto ("E pluribus unum"). An olive branch extended to the left, and a sheaf of arrows to the right. A wide dark blue border, its outer rim dotted with tiny white stars, encircled the plate. The beyond that was a twisted gold rope ("in the Alhambra style"). The edges of the plate were scalloped.

Mary Lincoln was thrilled with the design. She asked for only one change, that the blue band be replaced with "solferino." Solferino was a moderate purplish-red color similar to magenta – a highly popular color at the time. A dye that could create the solferino color had only been discovered in 1859, so asking for solferino color was asking for the trendiest color around. It was also close to purple, which was Mrs. Lincoln’s favorite color.

Mary Lincoln was so happy with the china service that she also ordered a small set for the family’s personal use. The Great Seal of the United States was replaced with a Gothic "ML" in the center.

The china was produced by Haviland & Co. in Limoges, France. American porcelain manufacturers simply were not up to the task of producing fine china, and could not have produced as many pieces as Mrs. Lincoln wished. Haviland undoubtedly gilded the edges with the gold rope and painted the solferino band on the plate, then shipped it to New York City. A stencil was used to create an outline of the image, which was then painted in by hand. The final design was slightly different than the Pierce Plate. The eagle faced left, not right; the clouds only formed the lower arc of a circle, and obscured the southwest corner of the shield; the olive branch was more prominent, and the arrows less numerous; and a glowing yellow sun (not glowing clouds) backed the eagle. The stars around the outer edge of the solferino band were now just gilt dots.

Lincoln ordered 666 pieces of china. The dining service (which consisted of two large salad bowls, four pickle bowls, 18 meat platters of various sizes, four fish platters of various sizes, two butter dishes, six vegetable platters, 96 dinner plates, 48 soup bowls, four water pitchers, and two ice bowls) consisted of 190 pieces. The dessert service (which consisted of custard cups, fruit bowls, strawberry bowls, sugar bowls, fruit baskets [some oval, some round], dessert plates, coffee cups, and two large shell-shaped bowls) consisted of 208 pieces. The breakfast/tea service (which consisted of tea plates, preserve plates, coffee cups, egg cups, tea cups, and cake plates ) consisted of 260 pieces. She also ordered four "servers" (large plates for serving chocolates) and four large centerpieces (white pelicans formed a pillar, on which was a large platform on which dishes could be presented).

Mrs. Lincoln also ordered three dozen gilded silver forks, 10 dozen silver-plated and iron-handled dinner knives, and six dozen dessert knives. It’s not clear who manufactured these.

She completed her purchases by ordering glassware. She purchased the glassware from Christian Dorflinger, a glassware company based in Brooklyn, New York. Two sets of glasses were ordered: Tinted-red sherry glasses, and a larger "toddy glass" (a wide-mouth drinking glass similar to a round, shallow martini glass). These had the Great Seal of the United States etched into their front. On the sides and backs were small flowers. A decorative border of umbrella-like shapes was etched into the lip, and the base featured groups of rays, spreading outward.

The china cost ,195. (The family’s personal china, which Mrs. Lincoln bought at a discount since it was ordered at the same time as the government-owned set, cost ,106.37.) She made a down payment of ,500 of her own money, and turned the invoice over to the federal government for payment.

E.V. Haughwout delivered the china on September 2, 1861. It is a myth that Abraham Lincoln thought the expense too much, and refused to pay it. The truth is that Lincoln approved the invoice a week before the china was received, and the federal government paid the invoice two weeks after the china arrived.

The Lincoln china is the first State Dinner Service chosen entirely by a First Lady.

There is, however, a second set of "Lincoln China."

By late 1864, much of the "Solferino" china set had been damaged or broken. It is not clear if there was some flaw in the china which made it easily broken (as the White House staff claimed) or whether the staff disliked Mrs. Lincoln and disliked her china and purposefully manhandled it. What is known as that by late 1864, only three full place settings, some teacups, and some odds and ends were left of the "Solferino" set.

On January 30, 1865, Mrs. Lincoln ordered a new set of china for the White House. This time, the importer was China Hall, a company owned by John Kerr of Philadelphia. The design this time was extremely simple: A white plate, with a buff border edged in gilt lines. This 508-piece set consisted of dining plates, soup plates, dessert plates, ice cream plates, a wide variety of dishes (large and small fish platters, vegetable platters, side dish platters), tureens, sauce boats, pickle dishes, salad bowls, custard cups, fruit baskets (round and oval), fruit platters, sugar bowls, coffee cups, coffee saucers, and other items. This 181-piece set cost ,700.

On February 28, Mrs. Lincoln made an addition order of coffee cups and saucers, water pitchers, and bowls. These 24 items were in the same style, and cost 3.50.

Mrs. Lincoln spent another 2 purchasing four dozen goblets and 28 dozen wine glasses of various sizes from China Hall as well.

The main set of china arrived in the United States via express shipment on February 13, 1865. But it was probably delivered just days before Abraham Lincoln was assassinated on April 15, 1865.

The receipt for the "Second Administration" buff china was delivered shortly after Andrew Johnson became President. The bill for the main china order and glassware was paid on August 29, 1865. The bill for the additional china was paid on February 10, 1866.

Interestingly, the Andrew Johnson administration decided to replace the entire Solferino china set with an identical set. This second order of "Lincoln china" did not last, either. By the end of the first Grant administration, there was not enough left to set dinner for eight or nine people.

Much of the "first Lincoln Solferino china" set and the Johnson administration "second Lincoln Solferino china" set were sold at auction to raise funds to purchase new china in the Grant administration. This was no unusual at all.

Beginning in 1875, reproduction pieces of the Solferino china was produced in the United States. It is interesting to note that Haviland did not begin stamping their name on the back of their china until 1876. But reproduction pieces usually have "Fabriqué par Haviland & Co./Pour/J. W. Boteler & Bro./Washington" painted or stamped on the back. Others were stamped "Administration/Abraham Lincoln" on the back. A large number of reproduction china services were made for sale at the the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876. Much of the "Lincoln china" which collectors have in their possession is reproduction china; the original china ordered by Mrs. Lincoln and Mrs. Andrew Johnson have no markings on the back.

As of 2010, the Smithsonian owned only a dinner plate, a two-handled custard cup, and the coffee cup and saucer used by Lincoln on April 14 (just before he attended Ford’s Theatre). The White House has a larger number of pieces, including a small oval platter, a meat platter, three compote dishes, an oval fruit basket, a coffee cup and saucer, a water pitcher, a fish platter, a dinner plate, a shallow bowl, and a soup bowl.

The buff band china is even harder to find! The Smithsonian has none of it. The White House has just a soup bowl and a gravy boat.

Entertainment, Mac Fan Version
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Image by Horrortaxi
This is the current state of our home theater, tv corner, or whatever you want to call it. This picture is optimized for Mac fans.

Offline Art by Aram Bartholl
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Image by transmediale
Photo by Julian Paul www.julian-paul.com

Aram Bartholl
Offline Art: ‘Your are not checked in’
Six positions capturing the state of social, mobile and post anything.

High Retention – Slow Delivery!!
Constant Dullaart, video 10:00 min, 2014
Artificial quantified social capital redistributed, Social media Socialism. 2.5 million Instagram followers were bought and distributed amongst a personal selection of the art-world active on Instagram.

A Letter To Young Internet Artists
Emilie Gervais, website, 2014
Art movements are as irrelevant as categorizing art under medium labels, because 2014 is about life.

Anti-social media protest
Citizens Against Social Media, protest, 2014
PROTEST AT THE SOCIAL MEDIA WEEK ROTTERDAM 2014

PLSS*
Claudia Mate, video, 2:12min, 2014
Portable Life Support System for the contemporary man.

lotru-on-hotpink.com – No Original Research series
Evan Roth, website, 2014
A series of websites, each created from a single animation and audio file found on wikipedia.org

Excellences & Perfections
Amalia Ulmann, video essay, 10:31 min, courtesy Arcadia Missa 2014
A scripted online performance on Instagram and Facebook.
credits: Rhizome.org for the social media archiving tool.

Curated by Aram Bartholl

The OFFLINE ART exhibition format:
Browser-based digital art works are broadcast locally from wifi routers which are not connected to the Internet. Each art work is assigned a single wifi router which is accessible through any device, like smart-phones, tablets or laptops. To access the different art works, the visitor has to connect to each network individually. The name of the network reflects the name of the artist. No matter what URL is opened, only the specific artwork appears in the browser. A small web server holding the art piece is installed on a USB flash drive which is connected to the router. Like frames holding the art, the routers are hung in the exhibition space which is otherwise empty. The art itself becomes visible only on the visitor’s private screen.The pieces are locally widely accessible but disconnected from the Internet.